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by admin last modified Aug 23, 2015 09:38 PM

Kathryn Schulz

This month's OUCH! deals with Backup and Recovery. Thanks to Kathryn Schulz' article on The Big One, the Pacific Northwest is abuzz with earthquake and tsunami talk. We're starting to think about Recovery. Consider what it's like to have a badly damaged house with no insurance records, not even the name of your insurer. You have no passwords, no computer and your backups are either inaccessible or destroyed. OlympusNet will address that topic at length this fall.

Kathryn Schulz is noteworthy on another account - her book Being Wrong. Schulz welcomes wrongness as a window into our makeup, not for self-help but for understanding. We occupy the Being Wrong state more often than we like; our friends, family and associates do, our cities do, countries do. Her book draws from the great philosophers, medicine and aviation, sparing us from pop-psych. Schulz' TED talk on Being Wrong may be found here.  —Ned Schumann

SANS OUCH! for August: Backup & Recovery

Overview
Sooner or later, you most likely will have something go wrong and lose your personal files, documents or photos. Examples include accidently deleting the wrong files, hardware failure, losing your laptop or infecting your computer. At times like these, backups are often the only way you can rebuild your digital life. In this newsletter, we explain what backups are, how to back up your data and develop a strategy that’s right for you.

Backup & Recovery
Sooner or later, you most likely will have something go wrong and lose your personal files, documents or photos. Examples include accidently deleting the wrong files, hardware failure, losing your laptop or infecting your computer. At times like these, backups are often the only way you can rebuild your digital life. In this newsletter, we explain what backups are, how to back up your data and develop a strategy that’s right for you.

What to Back Up and When
Backups are copies of your information that are stored somewhere else. When you lose important data, you can recover that data from your backups. The problem is that most people do not perform backups, which is a shame because they can be simple and inexpensive.

Recovery
Backing up your data is only half the battle; you have to be certain that you can recover it. Check every month that your backups are working by recovering a file and validating the contents. In addition, be sure to make a full system backup before a major upgrade (such as moving to a new computer or mobile device) or a major repair (like replacing a hard drive) and verify that it is restorable.

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